Protecting its Own Laws

Protecting its Own Laws

Protecting its Own Laws

Last week the US Supreme Court agreed that the Kentucky Attorney General has the right to defend that state’s law that prohibits surgical abortions. A pro-life governor signed the bill into law in twenty eighteen but then lost that same year to a pro-abortion governor. Abortion clinics challenged the law in the courts, and the new governor refused to defend it. The pro-life attorney general appealed to intervene but was denied in the lower federal courts. Justice Samuel Alito, writing for the majority, said a state has a “weighty interest” in “protecting its own laws.”

While the court didn’t deal with the content of the law, a decision like this bodes well for upholding the rule of law. When a state passes a law, an elected official should be able to defend it. Now, if no elected official chooses to defend it, that’s a different matter. With our current governor and attorney general, this very situation could happen—because elections have real consequences.

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